Nigerian dating site scam

"He said he was going to pay me back double," she laughs.

Though the amounts and details of the scam vary from victim to victim, when it comes to romance scams, the con is almost always the same: The crook wants to get a besotted victim to wire money or provide access to a credit card.

These heartless fraudsters, known as Nigerian scammers, are much, much worse than your parasitic ex. The Nigerian scam has long been flagged as a common type of cyber crime. Financial Crimes Division of the Secret Service reportedly receives 100 calls a day from people claiming to be victims of a Nigerian scam. Here's how the con typically works: You get an email from someone asking for your help. To obtain an arrest warrant for the perpetrator, you'd have to acquire a huge body of evidence of email communications, phony documents, bank transactions, etc.

Then, once you hand over your banking info and pay a "small fee" to cover the expenses related to the transfer, the so-called "prince" sucks your savings dry. If an unsolicited email reads like a drunk text, it's probably a hoax. That's a clear sign that Sandra doesn't know what the hell she's talking about. Spare yourself the trauma of a drawn-out, potentially inconclusive criminal investigation.

Scammers take advantage of people looking for romantic partners, often via dating websites, apps or social media by pretending to be prospective companions.

They play on emotional triggers to get you to provide money, gifts or personal details.

Sh'reen Morrison had been on an online dating site for only a few weeks before she realized that something was seriously wrong with the man who had been actively pursuing her by text message and email.

They'd hit it off right away, and he said he lived just outside of Phoenix, which seemed relatively proximate to a woman in remote Yuma, Ariz. First, he was traveling through India with his daughter.

If you are over 40, recently divorced, a widow, elderly or disabled then all the better in his eyes.These are examples of some of the most notorious scams in the world of online dating and on the internet in general.This is one of the most popular scams in online dating.The Nigerian scam is also called the "419" scam because 419 is the article of the Nigerian penal code that prosecutes fraud. Your best defense against a Nigerian scam is not to fall for it in the first place.Another name for this scam is the "advance-fee" scam because the fraudster asks you to pay money before you get the payoff (that never actually arrives). Here's how to avoid getting swindled by 419 fraud: Sometimes, multiple scammers will pose as one person; other times, one scammer will pose as a wealthy Nigerian, attorney, travel agent, lawyer, government official, etc. Everything the scammer tells you — their name, address, occupation, and sob story — is a complete lie.You or someone you know may be dating this person online right now. No matter how good they sound, things aren't what they appear to be.

988

Leave a Reply